Manitoba’s Parks Little Limestone Lake Woodland Caribou East Side Lake Winnipeg Ochiwasahow: The Fisher Bay Area

Manitoba’s Parks

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Little Limestone Lake

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Woodland Caribou

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East Side Lake Winnipeg

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Ochiwasahow: The Fisher Bay Area

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Latest headlines

Jul 23 14
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MEC Big Wild Challenge Trail Run supports CPAWS Manitoba with Fun and Fund Matching!
As we all know, there is nothing quite like the sweet surge of oxygen that comes with a deep breath of fresh, wilderness air. In Manitoba, we have the boreal forest to thank for that, which is why MEC and the Canadian Parks & Wilderness Society invite you join us for the first MEC Big Wild Challenge Trail Run; an event to celebrate Manitoba’s boreal forests while raising money for the protection of our at-risk wilderness spaces

Jul 14 14
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Canada’s parks faring worse than last year but Manitoba gets good marks
Winnipeg – In its sixth annual review of the state of Canada’s parks, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS) finds that many parks and proposed protected areas are facing greater challenges than they were a year ago. On a brighter note, Manitoba gets good marks for launching a process to create a huge new park to protect polar bears and other species around the Hudson’s Bay coast. And in breaking news, Conservation Minister Gord Mackintosh recently announced that consultations will soon begin for protection of the massive Seal River ecosystem. The proposed Polar Bear Provincial Park could be as large as 29,000 square kilometers, which is comparable to the size of Vancouver Island. The Seal River ecosystem is 50,000 square kilometers, close to the size of Nova Scotia, and is is one of the few large intact watersheds in the world. The Seal is also northern Manitoba’s largest free-flowing, undammed river.

May 09 14
A Living Landscape
Lake Winnipeg and the boreal forest that surrounds it are part of an interconnected natural life-support system that operates for the mutual ecological benefit of all of its parts. Humans have a place within this system, too.

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